(Shared) 50 Reasons Homeschooled Kids Love Being Homeschooled.

Found this on Facebook, but I thought it would be appropriate to share it here, since homeschooling experiences may, at times, figure into blog posts. As a homeschooling dad, I can say that PJ’s aren’t an option, but it was interesting to compare this list of collected responses with the comments I’ve heard from my own children.

http://www.weirdunsocializedhomeschoolers.com/why-homeschooled-kids-like-being-homeschooled/

From a teaching and administration standpoint, it might be wise to remember that public education in the United States as we now know it is something that right around 100 years old. In the history of education, even in these United States, a good education at the primary levels looked less like what we see today, and more like what homeschooling families experience. This is not to say that teachers in public education are bad people, nor that I regret all of my own public education. Having said that, I am thankful for the freedom and responsibility for homeschooling.

(Shared) 50 Reasons Homeschooled Kids Love Being Homeschooled.

Telling True Stories – A Review

Earlier this week, I finished reading “Telling True Stories”, edited by Mark Kramer and Wendy Call (Plume, 2007, ISBN 978-0-452-28755-6). This is another writing book that I’m certain that I will read again, both in parts and the whole. I have others on my shelf that evoke similar sentiments, of course, but this book particularly strikes me in several ways. It is focused on nonfiction writing, yet it ignores neither narrative nor poetry. Indeed, the various writers praise both story and “song” as a way to enhance nonfiction writing. Also, the book includes original contributions by many (more than 50) authors, some familiar and some obscure. This tapestry of experience has produced a delightful and multi-faceted creation. Many of these authors, whether drawing upon their own work, or well-known works of others, show vivid examples that made me think, “Aha, and now I see”. In other cases, I thought, “Hmmm. Now, I would never have made that connection on my own.”

Still others provided enough tease that I decided to purchase or borrow one of their books. David Halberstam is one of those authors. He wrote a book entitled “The Teammates” about baseball legends Dominic DiMaggio, John Pesky, and Ted Williams, of the Boston Red Sox. Fascinating stuff this was. I love baseball, anyway, though I don’t follow it much these days. The story was so well written, though, I had a hard time putting it down.

This book includes additional value in the little things. Various sidebars are scattered throughout the book, including one on “The Ladder of Abstraction”, one panel discussion on interviewing techniques entitled “To tape or Not to Tape”, and another entitled “A Storyteller’s Lexicon”. The book also includes a list of website resources, a thorough index,  one-paragraph biographical sketches of all the contributors, and a suggested reading list that goes beyond a simple bibliography and is keyed to those contributors.

Section titles include, “An Invitation to Narrative”; “Finding, Researching, and Reporting Topics”; “Name Your Subgenre”; “Constructing a Structure”; “Building Quality into the Work”; “Ethics”; “Editing”; “Narrative in the News Organization”; and “Building a Career in Magazines and Books”.

Great stuff. It took me a whole year to read it and digest it. It was well worth the time. Even though I don’t recall where I bought this book, or how much I paid, definitely I would say it has been worth the money. You will enjoy it, too, dear reader.

 

Telling True Stories – A Review

Derek Walcott on style

In  Telling True Stories, edited by Mark Kramer and Wendy Call (Plume, c2007), Emily Hiestand says this, on page 199:

“The poet Derek Walcott tells students that their language should be clear as water and so complete that readers can detect the  weather  of the poem.”

I really like that, for it is memorable. It will stick in me like cockleburrs on a poodle.

Derek Walcott on style

Goodreads

I like Goodreads. I’ve been using it for awhile on my phone, and I sign in using my Facebook ID. Now, I like it even more. For some time now, I wanted to have a currently reading spot on my blog, but the last time I checked, nothing was available. If I went to TypePad, I could have it there, apparently. Dan Eads has it there. Now, I can. Just look at my sidebar.  (To look at my sidebar, click on the ≡ character in the upper right corner of this blog’s page.) Also on my sidebar is a blog roll and a few other options.

Goodreads

Remember to Vote!

I plan to vote this morning, as soon as the polls open. That way, if I get a trouble call during normal work hours, or after work, I won’t have to miss the opportunity and incredible privilege of voting.  I hope all of you readers that are United States citizens and are eligible to vote will do so.

This link (for Minnesota residents) has an added feature, after you enter your address information also shows ballot initiatives and a sample ballot. Both the box above and Minnesota link give information about polling place location and names on the ballot.

Quote

Why does two plus two equal four?

I happened upon this little gem, as I followed the WordPress notice of a new follower. Thanks, honking goose, for following DandelionEnd!

As I mused upon the post, and the well-considered comments, I apparently randomized in my thinking. Although honking goose On the simpler end of the spectrum, I was reminded of Dr. Seuss and “On Beyond Zebra”, but I was also reminded of G.K. Chesterton. I know, the two are so much alike, right? But the line that connects all three dots, I think, is a wonder at the way things are, rather than a mere acceptance of the custom.

In my head, I could probably take as many directions with this as a bicycle wheel has spokes. But I like what Chesterton says in Orthodoxy, in his chapter entitled “The Ethics of Elfland”.

“When we are asked why eggs turn to birds or fruits fall in autumn, we must answer exactly as the fairy godmother would answer if Cinderella asked her why mice turned to horses or her clothes fell from her at twelve o’clock. We must answer that it is “magic”. It is not a “law,” for we do not understand its general formula. It is not a necessity, for though we can count it happening practically, we have no right to say that it must always happen.”

Wonder, and wondering, are closely related, I should think, though perhaps not exactly synonymous. In any event, both are necessary for healthy human beings, and particularly, for children. Well, I should amend that to say that encouraging wonder and wondering in children is necessary for their development. Yet, it is also necessary for us, as adults. For from wonder, does not thankfulness spring?

I do not say the world contains no absolutes, and all is relative. For an order may be observed in the universe. But like Chesterton, I am often amazed at this order, and it is good.

Why does two plus two equal four?